HomeAbout UsServicesLinksFAMILY AND FRIEND PAGEReferralsContact Us

This site  The Web 

 

Doctor

The National Institute of Drug Abuse estimated approximately 560,000 Americans age 12 and older abused heroin in 2006, and 10 of the 15 highest regions of non-medical pain medication use were in Southern states.

Opiate addiction is now known to be a chronic brain disease who's risk is influenced both by genetic and environmental factors. Use of opiates disrupts normal brain functioning, and prolonged use may result in changes to the extent that the brain does not return to "normal" upon stopping opiate use. Whether, or to what extent, the brain recovers is highly individual, depending on both length of use and biological factors. Due to variability in brain recovery, many addicts may require prolonged treatment or supportive medications in order to discontinue their addictive lifestyles. Because opiate use activates the area of the brain associated with pleasurable experiences and survival, such as eating, opiate use begins to mean survival to the addicts brain. Additionally, the brain's natural pain killers, known as endorphins, are no longer produced due opiate use. Disruption of endorphin production is thought to be associated with a need to increase opiate use in order to avoid the onset of painful withdrawal symptoms.

Signs and Symptoms of Addiction

Opiate addiction is characterized by lack of control over drug use, compulsive craving and use of a drug, and continued use regardless of the physical, emotional and social consequences. Some of the signs and symptoms of opiate addiction may include but are not limited to:

  • Restlessness
  • Hyperactive behavior
  • Poor physical coordination
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Poor judgment
  • Slurred speech
  • Bouts of euphoria followed by bouts of extreme depression
  • Accelerated heartbeat which can ultimately result in coma or death

An addict may display marked changes in attitude and behavior. Relationships with family members and friends deteriorate rapidly. Performance at work and/or school decreases.

Opiate Treatment

The road to opiate addiction treatment begins by understanding that this is a brain disorder and not a will power or moral issue, and that treatment options are available to those that suffer with this disease.

PREGNANCY AND OPIATE ADDICTION

If you are pregnancy get help right away. Talk opennly with your obgyn, counselor and medical team. Be honest. .

THINGS TO KNOW WHILE ON METHADONE,  

ALABAMA Methadone treatment  centers that accept state funding  have priority Admissions

Pregnant Woman with IV  Substance Abuse Disorders

Pregnant Woman with Substance Abuse Disorders

All Other IV Substance Abuse Disorders

All other Substance Abuse Disorders  

 

 

 

ITS TIME TO START A NEW LIFE

ITS TIME TO GET HELP

OPIATE ADDICTION IS A SERIOUS ISSUE: IT IS TREATABLE!!!!! THERE ARE PLACES TO HELP YOU!!!

 

Please Feel at ease to contact any treatment center if you have questions,

Susan Staats Combs MEd, LPC, NCC,MAC

President of ALAMTA

CO Owner of Shelby County Treatment Center and Chilton County Treatment Center

Alabama Substanec Abuse Coordinating Commitee

Alabama Governors Council for Opiod Abuse  

President Of Recovery Gardens  


Welcome Mat